Calling the Voyager fuel card program unmanageable and uneconomic, the USPS Office of Inspector General recommends that the Postal Service use another method to manage fuel under its HCR contracts. In its advisory report dated September 30, 2014, the OIG concludes that the Voyager fuel card program has cost more money that it saved and discourages fuel efficiency. The Postal Service spent $5.1 billion for 1.6 billion gallons of fuel for Highway Contract Route (HCR) contracts under the program over the last nine years.
Continue Reading Voyager card fuel program is unmanageable, says USPS OIG

The Postal Service spent $2.8 billion on 16,993 Highway Contract Route (HCR) contracts in 2011, according to a newly released audit report by the U.S. Postal Service Office of Inspector General (OIG).  The OIG conducted the audit to assess the integrity of data in the Transportation Contract Support System (TCSS). OIG found the TCSS data is accurate. In a spot-check of 196 sampled contracts, OIG did not find a single data error. But there was one area of disagreement with management. OIG contended that 94% of the sampled contracts did not have proper funding approval documentation prior to contract award. Postal management disagreed with this conclusion, saying that advance funding approval was obtained through other methods.
Continue Reading Postal Service spent $2.8 billion on highway transportation in 2011

DCAA’s March 28, 2012 memorandum summarizes DCAA’s approach to the new DFARS Contractor Business Systems rules. As we discussed in our earlier entries, the DFARS regulations and clauses call for a determination of the adequacy of a contractor’s business systems—accounting, estimating, purchasing, material management—and allow a contracting officer to withhold five percent of contract payments

The USPS Office of Inspector General (OIG) recently announced that it will be auditing the Postal Service’s Suspension and Debarment program. Debarments most frequently result from a criminal conviction of a company, or its employees. But a contractor can be debarred for any type of improper conduct that negatively reflects on its honesty, ethics, or competence. Resulting debarments have government-wide impact. The thrust of the audit appears to be whether USPS is debarring enough contractors. Read on for more details about OIG’s upcoming audit.
Continue Reading USPS OIG to evaluate Postal Service’s Debarment and Suspension program

The Commission on Wartime Contracting’s final report [pdf] asserts that upwards of $60 billion in U.S. tax dollars have been lost to fraud, waste, and abuse in Iraq and Afghanistan over the past decade. The independent Commission was created in 2008 to assess contingency contracting for logistics, security, and reconstruction, as well as to make recommendations to Congress in order to improve contracting practices. The Commission’s final report blames the staggering losses on a lack of oversight, poor planning, and corruption. Continue Reading Fraud, waste and abuse in Iraq & Afghanistan contracts

An interim rule published by the Department of Defense authorizes DoD contracting officers to withhold payment from contractors whose business systems they deem deficient. Issued on May 18, 2011, the rule implements Section 893 of the Ike Skelton National Defense Authorization Act of 2011, which we discuss here. It authorizes COs to withhold up to ten percent of progress payments if the CO determines that the contractor’s business systems contain significant deficiencies. The new rule applies to solicitations issued on or after May 18, 2011. COs are encouraged to amend existing solicitations with the new requirements “to the extent feasible.”
Continue Reading Withholding payment for deficiencies in contractor business systems

Developments in the OFCCP’s investigation of compensation disparities at United Space Alliance, LLC are worthy of consideration. During a 2009 desk audit, OFCCP conducted a standard threshold test of United Space Alliance’s compensation data.  Although this audit uncovered no indicators of pay discrimination, OFCCP conducted additional tests of the data, commonly known as the “pattern analysis” and the “30 and 5 Refinement” tests. These tests revealed potential pay bias, and OFCCP requested more extensive compensation data to examine the question more closely. The case begins when United Space Alliance refused to comply with OFCCP’s request.
Continue Reading United Space Alliance’s temporary agreement with OFCCP

Congress recently passed legislation (Section 893 0f the National Defense Authorization Act of 2011) requiring the Secretary of Defense to develop a program ensuring that “contractor business systems” provide timely, reliable information for the management of Department of Defense programs.  “Contractor business systems” include accounting systems, estimating systems, earned value management systems, material management and accounting systems, and property management systems. 

The program required by this legislation will set requirements for contractor business systems, establish a process for reviewing contractor business systems, and provide for disapproval of any contractor business system that has a significant deficiency.  If a contractor business system is disapproved, DoD will work with the contractor to develop a corrective action plan.  Until the system is approved, DoD may withhold up to 10 percent of progress and other payments on cost type contracts with contractors that are covered by the Cost Accounting Standards.Continue Reading New Scrutiny for “Contractor Business Systems”