As part of our postal industry practice, we annually compile a list of the Top 150 USPS suppliers based on data received under the Freedom of Information Act.

In FY 2017, USPS spent $13.9 billion on outside purchases and rental payments, an increase of $181 million over last year.  The biggest increase went to the top 10 USPS suppliers. That group received a total of $3.9 billion, up $400 million from last year and accounting for 28 percent of the Postal Service’s total spend. The Top 150 suppliers received $9.2 billion, about two-thirds of the agency’s total spend. Only 81 suppliers collected revenues exceeding $25 million in 2017.

As it has since 2002, Federal Express Corporation lands atop the list, this year with $1.61 billion in revenues—about a $68 million drop from its 2016 earnings. FedEx carries package and letter mail for the Postal Service. FedEx’s air cargo network contract with the Postal Service has been extended several times, and the latest extension takes it to September 29, 2024.

Continue Reading Top 150 U.S. Postal Service suppliers get more in FY 2017

Top 150 first page FY 2015Transportation and technology companies dominate the top 10 spots on the list of the Top U.S. Postal Service Suppliers for FY 2015.  Federal Express Corporation again tops the list, a position it has held since 2002. Overall, the Postal Service spent $12.5 billion on outside purchases, about half of it on transportation.

FedEx, now in the third year of a seven-year air cargo network contract, received nearly $1.4 billion in revenue, a 3 percent drop from last year. Package giant United Parcel Service is also among the agency’s top suppliers, earning $154 million in postal revenues and moving up from No. 12 to No. 11.

Other transportation-related companies in the top 10 include trucking company Salmon Companies, Inc. (No. 4, $229 million); Victory Packaging, logistics and distribution services provider for ReadyPost and other packaging supplies programs (No. 5, $212 million); commercial airline United Airlines, Inc. (No. 6, $197 million); and auto-parts supplier Wheeler Bros., Inc. (No. 9, $175 million). Not far behind are trucking company Eagle Express Lines, Inc., No. 12 ($140 million); cargo airline Kalitta Air, LLC, No. 15 ($97 million); and commercial airline Delta Air Lines, Inc., No. 16 ($93 million).

Technology-related companies on the list start with EnergyUnited Electric Membership Corporation, which provides telecommunication and energy billing services. EnergyUnited is again the Postal Service’s second-largest supplier with $440 million in revenue, most of which is paid out to other companies. At No. 3 is Honeywell International, Inc., which received $273 million under its contract to provide 225,000 Mobile Delivery Devices (MDD). Letter carriers use the MDD to scan mail and packages.

HP Enterprise Services, LLC, a provider of computer equipment, ranks No. 7 with $192 million in revenue, about $20 million more than last year. Accenture Federal Services, which provides enterprise technology and consulting services to the agency, is ranked No. 8 with $188 million. International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) and AT&T Corporation again placed in the Top 20. EMC Corporation, which recently won a Postal Service contract to provide information storage and management services, has already cracked the Top 20 with $81 million in postal revenue.

Rounding out the Top 10 with $159 million in revenue is Northrop Grumman Corporation, which operates the Postal Service’s central repair facility in Topeka, Kansas.

David Hendel, a partner at Husch Blackwell, has compiled annual lists of the top Postal Service contractors since 2002, including these lists from 2010 – 2014.

The Court of Federal Claims has issued an important decision establishing that offerors will be held accountable for making inaccurate representations in proposals. According to the Court’s decision in GTA Containers, Inc. v. United States, No. 11-606C (Fed. Cl. Feb. 22, 2012) [pdf], proof that an offeror made a misrepresentation in its proposal is sufficient to sustain a bait-and-switch protest if the agency relied on the misrepresentation.

Continue Reading Clarifying the standard of proof for bait-and-switch protests at the Court of Federal Claims