"Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs"

On July 7, 2011, the Department of Labor released its regulatory agenda for the next 6-12 months.  The agenda for the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) contains five items:  compensation, construction, veterans, disabilities, and sex discrimination.  OFCCP hosted a live Q&A session on its regulatory agenda on July 12, confirming its new aggressive approach.

Continue Reading OFCCP’s regulatory agenda signals increased enforcement efforts

On June 28, 2011, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) released a new directive specifically authorizing the use of Functional Affirmative Action Programs (FAAPs) and detailing applicable procedures.  While most covered contractors prepare affirmative action plans based on establishment, some contractors (typically, very large, multi-establishment companies) conclude that an affirmative action plans based on function or unit (such as sales, or R&D), which cut across establishments, more appropriately analyze the workforce.
Continue Reading FAAPs are back, but with significant changes

Developments in the OFCCP’s investigation of compensation disparities at United Space Alliance, LLC are worthy of consideration. During a 2009 desk audit, OFCCP conducted a standard threshold test of United Space Alliance’s compensation data.  Although this audit uncovered no indicators of pay discrimination, OFCCP conducted additional tests of the data, commonly known as the “pattern analysis” and the “30 and 5 Refinement” tests. These tests revealed potential pay bias, and OFCCP requested more extensive compensation data to examine the question more closely. The case begins when United Space Alliance refused to comply with OFCCP’s request.
Continue Reading United Space Alliance’s temporary agreement with OFCCP

The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs has been busy the past few months and anticipates heightened activity in the months to come. New OFCCP initiatives include: (1) asserting jurisdiction over healthcare providers, (2) revamping efforts to identify workers misclassified as contractors; (3) proposing new affirmative action regulations for construction contractors; and (4) increasing enforcement